Bargain Properties

The Inspection Report

Are you looking for a home and becoming tired of house-hunting? If so, you may be tempted to buy a bargain-priced home "as is" and forego the home inspection. But without the inspection report, do you know what the "as it" refers to? Wouldn't it be better to know what condition the home is in before you buy it?

The inspection contingency allows the buyer to enlist the services of a licensed home inspector within three to seven days after the purchase agreement is signed. The inspector will go over the property from top to bottom, evaluating the condition of all the basic systems and structures of the home in order to identify conditions that may be considered material defects and thus may affect the market value or the safety of the home.

The inspector's report is the only documented proof of the actual condition of the property that is being sold. It is a valuable tool that helps you negotiate the sales contract and gives you information about future maintenance projects. The cost of an inspection is well worth the peace of mind it provides.

Advice From Real Estate Agents

When buying a home, it is essential to cooperate as closely as possible with your real estate agent. This can be challenging, especially if your agent asks you to do some things that you don't particularly want to do to in order to get you moved into your new home as quickly as possible.

When real estate agents advise you regarding ways to make the transaction work, they are acting as part coach and part business consultant. If you find the house you love and want to "sleep on" the decision for a few days, the agent knows that you run the risk of losing the house. If you are inclined to complicate your offer with clauses that might make the contract unattractive to the sellers, the agent may ask you to consider some modifications. Should you call the week before the closing with an attack of "buyer's remorse", your agent knows the cure. Following your real estate agent's suggestions will increase your chances for a successful move!

A Home with History

A colorful history can add significantly to the value of a home. Researching the provenance of a property you are interested in buying can be both interesting and ultimately profitable. The market value of a home will be greater if it was designed by a notable architect, built by a company with a reputation for the finest construction, or lived in by a celebrity who hosted famous guests.

Ask your real estate agent if there is any historical data of significance associated with the home, or if previous owners were VIPs. Note the names associated with the deed and title to the home, and look them up with the help of the local historical society. Consult the microfiche in newspaper archives for references to colorful details of the home's past. The county assessor's office may have records of the date the home was built, and building permits may reveal the name of the architect. When inspecting the home, search closets and attics carefully for hidden historical "treasures".

Buying an older home at a bargain price, then re-selling when it is renovated and restored can be an enjoyable and lucrative adventure.